The Components of Research The scientific method is a logical procedure in which research is conducted and a hypothesis is formulated and observations and experimentation are used to test the hypothesis

The Components of Research The scientific method is a logical procedure in which research is conducted and a hypothesis is formulated and observations and experimentation are used to test the hypothesis. The scientific method is sequential steps taken to prove or disprove a hypothesis. The components to the scientific method are similar to the characteristics of a report. The report must contain a clear thesis statement that includes the purpose for the study and research and data collection, evidence of observations, data analysis, and conclusion (Locke, Silverman Spirduso, 2010). Using a variety of sources and references is crucial to formulate trust and using reliable sources such as peer related journals creates a sense of knowing for the reader. Sources of Information A primary source is also called an original source. It is a source of information that was created at the time of the study. A secondary source of information was created at a later time and did not participate first hand in the event. Secondary sources are scholarly articles and journals. (Library Guides Distinguish Between Primary and Secondary Sources Home, 2018) Reasons why someone would suspend trust include sampling and conflict of interest. If it is discovered that the sample groups are chosen to manipulate the outcome and results are generalized, leads the reader to suspend trust in the research data. Also, if it is discovered that someone involved in the research has a conflict of interest, that leads the reader to question the validity of the results because of questioning the influence the researcher had on the outcome of data (Locke, Silverman Spirduso, 2010). The Use and Misuse of Research Ginkgo biloba No Effect by Steven Novella, had original finding indicated that by taking Ginkgo Biloba, the consumer would have improvement of cognitive function and it would treat, prevent, or reduce the effects of Alzheimers disease or other dementia. The study was rigorous and involved 3109 subjects aged 72-96 years of age taking Gingko biloba at 120mg twice a day for a median of 6.1 years. Subjects were followed with standardized tests of cognitive function. There was no difference in cognitive function, risk of developing dementia, rate of progression of dementia or normal cognitive decline with aging (Novella, 2009). This is an example of how manipulating data can create false promises and dissatisfaction and disappointment of consumers who believe the research study. Established Tools for Measurement The flow chart and the expanded flow chart are useful tools for representing data. The flowchart was invented by Frank Gilbreth. A flowchart is a type of diagram that represents an algorithm, workflow or process, showing the steps as boxes of various kinds, and their order by connecting them with arrows. This diagrammatic representation illustrates a solution model to a given problem. Flowcharts are used in analyzing, designing, documenting or managing a process or program in various fields ( HYPERLINK https//en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flowchart https//en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flowchart). The flowchart is a useful tool that allows to display visuals for understanding the sequencing in a given problem, (Locke, Silverman Spirduso, 2010). Types of Research Quantitative research method focuses on data collection and emphasizes statistics and numerical data by various means such as surveys, polls, and questionnaires. Qualitative Research is primarily exploratory research which helps to gain understanding and insight into a problem. Data collection methods include focus groups, interviews and observations (Locke, Silverman Spirduso, 2010). For example, as we were determining which electives to offer next school year, we did an interest poll and offered possible electives. Students completed the survey and based on the data, we created a list of electives based on the results of the survey. This is an example of using a quantitative research method to determine an outcome. References Novella, S. (2009). Ginkgo biloba No Effect. Retrieved from HYPERLINK https//sciencebasedmedicine.org/ginkgo-biloba-no-effect/ https//sciencebasedmedicine.org/ginkgo-biloba-no-effect/ Flowchart. (2018). Retrieved from https//en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flowchart Library Guides Distinguish Between Primary and Secondary Sources Home. (2018). Retrieved from https//guides.library.ucsc.edu/primarysecondary Locke, L., Silverman, S., Spirduso, W. (2010). Reading and understanding research (3rd ed.). Thousand Oaks Sage Publ. Novella, S. (2009). Ginkgo biloba No Effect. Retrieved from https//sciencebasedmedicine.org/ginkgo-biloba-no-effect/ The Use and Misuse of Statistics. (2000). Retrieved from https//sharklearn.nova.edu/webapps/blackboard/content/listContent.jspcourse_id_328648_1content_id_7108779_1 PAGE PAGE 2 _OuKC
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